Eggs are good!

An image of a poached egg on gluten free toast with lots of freshly cracked black pepper, sea salt and coconut oil in place of butter. I’ve used this image as it represents the various changes I’ve made to my diet over the years but perhaps even more since investing in a medical procedure in 2012?

I’m not healed… yet but I firmly believe a positive, open mind that attempts to stay aware of what’s going on around it is going to form the cornerstone of any recovery (no matter how large or small).
  • Eggs have had a bad rap in times past but I choose to aim for about one a day… but without the whites. the runny yolk has a similar consistency to the phospholipid liquid I take every morning (I mention it first, here). Rather than avoid cholesterol containing foods we should seek out clean versions of them. Our body’s use cholesterol for so many essential processes (not least turning sunshine into vitamin D.The whites are the most allergenic part of the egg apparently (and the part I like least) so I don’t find it a problem to avoid but if I’m offered scrambled eggs by a loved one? I’ll take it!
  • Gluten free toast was the first change I made as grains can cause tiny holes in the gutlining letting food into the bloodstream before it’s ready (intestinal permeability) and then can go on to create an immune response from an already confused immune system. gluten free some argue is not much better than gluten containing.
  • Pepper I just like very much and have been eating more of it whilst avoiding members of the nightshade family (dried chili flakes in this instance) to try and heal the leaky gut I spoke of in an earlier post.
  • I use Himalayan, Rock or Sea salt as they taste nicer and choose to avoid the free running granules/table salt as much as possible. It’s when salt is processed and stripped of its naturally occurring minerals (sometimes showing up as colour) that we can end up with problems. Also I have low BP so, at the moment have no need to worry about it rising a little. Increased blood pressure may help a sluggish circulatory system?
  • Coconut oil I also like very much which is also lucky as many people say it’s so damned good for you. Originally we came from the tropics where we’ve gotten used to eating coconuts (is one version I’ve heard to explain why they’re so good and easily digested). The fats from them are quickly turned to energy without needing to use the liver or bile salts, first. The fatty acids it gets quickly broken down into (lauric and caprylic acid) are anti-fungal, anti-microbial and just all sorts of good especially if you’re dealing with fatigue for any number of reasons eg malabsorption lingering infections all stuff that tires the body.

poached egg on gluten free toast

These four approaches represented by the poached egg are me trying not to rock the boat. I want stuff that’s in my gut to stay there til I’ve absorbed everything from it and it’s good and ready to leave! Obviously this isn’t the main part of my diet, that’s non nightshade veg but I find the protein sets me up for the day (with some sprouted seeds in the egg sandwich) future post on sprouts to follow but before that, a post will soon follow on the results of that medical procedure that I think I’ve noticed.

 

as ever, I’m not a doctor and the food choices I’ve made have made sense for me – that’s not to say they’ll make sense for you but it’s still worth paying attention to how our bodies react to the stuff we put in it.

 

Risk:Reward?

It’s a good idea to try and keep aware of all the aspects of the treatments we’re choosing to take; water soluble vitamins (like vit C and some Bvits) don’t carry much risk as the body will get rid of any extra the next time you go to the toilet. The ‘oily’ vitamins (vit A,D,E and K)  also known as the sunshine vitamins) do carry a greater risk of toxicity as the body stores what it doesn’t need in our fat cells.

Depending on the health of our arteries High Intensity Interval Training (mentioned here and here) could bring on a stroke a la Andrew Marr. I’m not suggesting don’t exercise to save yourself! but do take it slowly if you haven’t exercised much recently. But exercise fast or slow is not what this post is about.

dog for the disabled enjoying a rest in the sun

Some of the things I am doing at the moment that I need to work out my risk:reward profiles for:

  • Taking hemp oil (a few drops under the tongue a few times a day) for its CBD (cannabidiol). This is entirely legal so carries no risk of locking me up and throwing away the key but may not be as therapeutic as cannabis derived CBD? I’m not sure how much of an effect it’s having but found this resource which shows one person’s opinion on the miraculous benefits attached to various cannabis derivatives.
  • Another thing I’m doing weekly is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. which I have mentioned here and here and there was a post recently about the therapeutic use of oxygen.
  • A few weeks very unusual interruption of supply via Amazon temporarily halted my supplementation with phospholipids as mentioned in an earlier post.  This Hiatus highlighted even more to me that strengthening the edges of my cells is worth doing. They communicate better with each other which perhaps caused less balance over the past few weeks? It may be down to something else entirely but I’m consciously choosing to believe that this substance is having a good effect.

Luckily, taking the hemp oil doesn’t leave the taker feeling ‘stoned’ or in any way chemically inconvenienced so doesn’t interfere with my driving to get to my local MS Therapy Centre which houses the hyperbaric chamber that creates the environment for increased density of oxygen molecules n the body.

The treamtment is 20 miles away along the main road leading out of one of the largest container ports in Europe. There are many collisions, near misses and stress in response to people driving very close to the car in front. On at least one side of the dual carriageway there’s stationary traffic inching its way past an accident in my 40 mile journey.

Every now and then I find it useful to assess the various supplements and treatments I do to see if they’re worth the time, effort and/or money.

I still believe it’s a therapy worth taking some risk for especially in light of this research. In the Journal Neurology and Neuroscience it has been noticed that there are some bloodflow issues in neurodegenerative conditions. Oxygen therapy, by increasing the level of O2 in the blood addresses possible hypoxia brought on by slowed venous return from the brain to the heart.

At the moment I figure it’s worth keeping my O2 levels topped up as mentioned here in a post from last summer.

In my next post I’ll describe what goes on after the drive to the tank.

D’oh, it’s dopamine!

lights

We’ve made it through the holidays.

Hurrah!

This post might seem long but it’s kind of all connected.

This post will be looking at how we might think a bit differently about aspects of ourselves by becoming more aware of the role of dopamine. You may have noticed from my somewhat nightmarish vision of christmas decorations and my language that I don’t relish the season we’ve now turned our back on. I’m preferring instead to embrace all that a New Year can bring. I don’t think I’ve ever been considered the life and soul of a party but that’s ok with me.

  • lacking drive?
  • low on motivation?
  • finding it hard to engage and live life fully?

All of the above could describe what I’ve always felt was part of my ‘nature’. Since signing up to 23andme (previous mentions of it here, here and here). I’m beginning to see that the chemistry lab in us all is shaped by our genes and so an impaired neurotransmitter production here and utilisation issue there might explain me sometimes preferring a good book to a good party.

I’m finding out the bits of me that don’t work as well as they could and realising my inner curmudgeon might in part, be thanks to the chemistry lab.

Many of the posts on this site are about investigating how to make life a little better. Sugar’s not come out smelling of roses on these pages. I’ve not been able to find anything good it can bring to the table apart from cake which we all know is really nice (for birthdays and very special occasions).

Having indulged in various sugary confections over the holidays I’m eager to get started on reducing the sugar again and getting back to a simpler way of eating. I talked about noticing the difference here but got a little distracted from my sugar free desires by birthday cake!

I found out something which might stiffen my resolve when it comes to the sweet stuff.

23andme analysis has thrown up some interesting things about dopamine in me. There are ways to protect what we have and get more, naturally. Finding I’m low in/poor at using this stuff through having wonky vitamin Dreceptors could answer an awful lot of questions about my behaviour in years past and the actions of a reformed sugar addict when relapsing with (gluten free) mince pies in recent weeks.

A diet high in sugar can wear out the dopamine receptors which can make what dopamine there is in the system less useful again.

One thing I’ll definitely be continuing with is supplementing with phospholipids over and above the

  • krill oil I take daily. I also started, back at the beginning of December taking two teaspoonfuls every morning of
  • Empirical Labs Phospholipid Complex. I bumped into this site whilst researching the stuff.

Go to about halfway down the NCBI post, The US National Centre for Biotechnology Information (better known as the reliable and often cited PubMed) for studies on depression, improvements in coping with stress as well as repairing brain matter. It really seems to be a wonder substance. It has a consistency a bit like bitumen or treacle (for its stickiness not sweetness). When I first started I thought it could waterproof the hull of any nearby boat. It helps strengthen the edges of all our cells not just those in the brain.

I think I feel… less… wobbly? Like I’m more in charge of keeping my body under control (both mentally and physically). I feel less prone to overbalancing whilst standing completely still. I thought this increased stability may have come from reducing a candida overgrowth since Septembe but the stability’s still there even after struggling to reduce my sugar consumption since a sugary christmas. more to follow on this struggle in another post.

Whatever caused the improvement I’m happy about it and whilst it would be nice to treat my body as an experiment and only change one variable at a time I also don’t want to hang about getting myself well.

After reading the US Pubmed post I’m going to make sure I never run out of this phospholipid complex ever again!

I think it’s fascinating the many and varied roles dopamine plays, including

  • brain function,
  • metabolism,
  • energy production aswell as affecting mood as mentioned at the top of this post.

The role that phospholipids seem to play in our harvesting of dopamine I’ve only just scratched at the surface of. You can perhaps tell I still have a lot more reading to do on the subject but thought I’d share this burst of enthusiasm with you!

There are so many possible suspects involved in us not feeling our best. I’m choosing to see the addressing of potential problems as a challenge to be entered into with curiosity and an open mind.

New Year’s resolutions are for the birds, feeling better is a lifelong undertaking (albeit taking in a few duvet days along the way). Cutting ourselves some slack/being kind to ourselves is just one way to get the best for and from us.

I hope, with a return to low sugar food in my diet and a regular intake of healthy fats I will achieve weight loss , my pre christmas energy levels and will have no need to make this noise.

happy New Year.